Wholesale Dealers of Insulated Piercing Connector P1-71 Supply to French

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Wholesale Dealers of Insulated Piercing Connector P1-71 Supply to French Detail:

 

Material main conductor: Insulated aluminum conductor

Material branch conductor: Insulated aluminum or Insulated copper conductor

Analogs: CD71, JBD, P71

 


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Wholesale Dealers of
 Insulated Piercing Connector P1-71 Supply to French detail pictures

Wholesale Dealers of
 Insulated Piercing Connector P1-71 Supply to French detail pictures


Wholesale Dealers of Insulated Piercing Connector P1-71 Supply to French, The product will supply to all over the world, such as: , , ,




  • http://chevroletforum.com/how-tos is the leading Chevy Silverado resource for technical DIY guides. Replace a clunking steering shaft in your Silverado in a few steps. For the full step-by-step article, please visit http://chevroletforum.com/how-tos/a/chevrolet-silverado-1999-2006-how-to-replace-clunking-steering-shaft-392422

    The Silverado is a great truck, there’s no question about it. But General Motors overlooked the matter of the so-called “intermediate shaft” in the steering assembly, and that oversight has led to an unfortunate clunking noise in many of these trucks.

    A lot of shops and shade-tree mechanics alike will tell you that packing your OEM steering shaft with grease will solve this issue. While it might temporarily “fix” the problem, the clunking noise will usually come back.

    This video covers how to install a re-engineered intermediate steering shaft that’s a little beefier and has better joints.

    This easy job takes about two hours and costs $100 dollars. A professional will charge $500 dollars or more to replace the steering shaft.

    This job requires a replacement intermediate shaft, a 15 millimeter socket and ratchet, 15 millimeter box-end wrench, torque wrench, and grease.

    Step One – Detach the top end of the steering shaft

    Use your box wrench to remove the 15 millimeter nut from the top end of the steering shaft bracket; you can see the connection behind the pedals. Then pop out the bolt and pull the steering shaft down to detach it from the steering column.

    Pro Tip
    Once the bolt and bracket are out, the steering wheel will be able to spin freely, but don’t let it. Make sure to keep it still in top dead center position or you could risk damaging some of the electronic components inside. Brace it with something if necessary.

    Step Two – Detach the bottom end of the steering shaft

    In the engine compartment, to the bottom left of the power brake booster is the bottom end of the intermediate steering shaft, which is connected to the lower steering shaft. Use your 15 millimeter box wrench to hold the bolt head still as you remove the 15 millimeter nut using the ratchet and socket.

    Once the nut is off, push the bolt out of the hole and separate the two shafts.

    You might have to get crafty with some kinetic persuasion, also known as whacking things with a hammer, but make sure not to get your fingers.

    Step Three – Remove the old intermediate steering shaft

    Move back into the footwell and pull the clunky old intermediate shaft out through the firewall.

    Then, compare it to the new one and make sure it will fit.

    Step Four – Install the new intermediate steering shaft

    ● Simply slip the bottom end of the steering shaft through the firewall.
    ● Apply some grease to the end, and connect it to the lower steering shaft.
    ● Then bolt them together.
    ● For the upper end of the steering shaft, simply pull it up and connect it to the steering column. Then re-install the bracket and tighten the bolt to 35 foot pounds.

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